“Are Some Bullets REALLY Worth The Extra Money???”

 

This Week’s Tips or Tricks…

 

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TIP:  Are some of those more expensive and “Match” Grade bullets REALLY worth the extra money…YES, pending you choose the correct bullets!  This week I put Berger Bullets up to a head-to-head competition against Hornady bullets in a bullet weight consistency challenge and the results were very interesting!

Note: All bullet grain weights recorded below were acquired from tests conducted using the very same Hornady Lock-N-Load Bench Scale PN #050108 and each bullet had to remain static on the same grain weight reading for a minimum of (3 seconds) before that value would be documented as part of the official test results.  Any potential and/or perceived discrepancies or errors for any of the given Berger and Hornady bullets resulted in those individual bullets being reweighed once again to ensure an unbiased accuracy and only then were the values documented.  Additionally, before and after each of the tests conducted below, a calibration weight was verified against a 50 gram calibration weight to ensure that both before and after scale weight readings were all within +/-0.01 grams for every test conducted to once again ensure unbiased accuracy results for these tests.

 

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Let's Talk Rifle Bullets...are some bullets really better than others???

 

 

I had to do some bullet weight sorting (light, medium, heavy) the other night for my Berger .223's and I got a wild hair to take a detour to analysis town and here is what I found...



I individually weighed (505) Berger .223 / 77 gr. Hybrids vs. (58) Berger .223 / 80 gr. VLD's to see how these two bullets stacked up against each other as far as grain weight consistency is concerned. These two were VERY similar as expected! Both the Berger (505) 77gr lot and (58) 80gr bullet lots were 61-62% being right on the money at their specified grain weight and only had an overall max deviation of +/-0.1 grains from their specified grain weight. So Lot-to-Lot, grain-to-grain, in the same caliber the Berger’s are very consistent overall in .224 Cal.



Below are the +/- weight deviations that I came up with for each of the bullet Lot #’s tested and by multiplying the number of 80 gr VLD bullets counted by (8.71) times, I was able to normalize the data collected in order to include the following charts as well.

 

 

 

 

I then individually weighed (58) Hornady .243 / 87 gr. V-Max bullets against (58) Berger .243 / 87 gr. VLD's and checked the bullet +/- max weight deviation for each of the bullets. How did Hornady stack up against Berger you ask in this test??? Not so great!!! The (58) 87 gr Hornady V-Max lot (all that I had left is why 58 became the magical survey number) ended up at only 39.66% of all weighed bullets being right on the money at their specified grain weight and deviated to as much as +/-0.3 grains from their specified grain weight. The Berger’s however were 27.58% more consistent at 67.24% of all weighed being +/-0.0 grains deviation from their specified bullet weight...so what does this mean??? This means that the .243 Cal 87 gr Berger VLD's compared to the Hornady 87 gr V-Max statistically would have ~27.58% LESS point of impact (POI) shift deviation when compared to the Hornady bullets when you start going the distance due to the varying bullet weights within the given Lot #!!!

 

 

 

 



 

To further this comparison, I then individually weighed (58) Hornady .308 / 168 gr. Match bullets against (58) Berger .308 / 168 gr. VLD's and checked the bullet +/- max weight deviation for each of these bullets. How did Hornady stack up against Berger in the test this time??? Not so great once again!!! The (58) 168 gr Hornady Match lot ended up at only 12.07% of all weighed bullets being right on the money at their specified grain weight and deviated to as much as +/-0.5 grains from their specified grain weight. The Berger’s however came in at 27.59% of all bullets weighed were right at the specified grain weight. For this test, the .308 Berger VLD's ended up at just 27.59% at +/-0.0 grains deviation from specified weight which still resulted in the Berger’s being (2.29) times MORE CONSISTENT than the Hornady bullets that came in at a dismal 12.07% of all bullets being +/-0.0 grains deviation from their specified bullet weight!!! So once again this means that the 168 gr Berger VLD's compared to the Hornady Match would have a minimum of ~15.52% LESS point of impact (POI) shift deviation compared to the Hornady Match bullets when you start going the distance!!!

 

 

 

 





So what is the moral of this story...some bullets certainly are better than other bullets depending on which ones you choose!!!  Additionally, we also see above that not all “Match” Grade bullets are created equally either…so just because they say “Match” on the box doesn’t mean you are going to get true “Match” Grade accuracy!!!

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Do you have a Tip or Trick regarding reloading that you would like to see posted?  Please send us your Tip(s) or Trick(s) and we will see about getting them posted!

 

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Written By:  Kyle R. CEO of Broken Box R LLC

 

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